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20121201
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train just rattling along the heading out of california, my first date for the center of oregon and all i'm hearing from that fat little man who bubbles with fine political advice and fumes about my enemies is the press boys are going wild with this thing. i can feel my eyes glancing at the headline in the left-wing smeared sheet the new york post, secret ridge man's trust fund keep nixon in style far beyond his salary, that was one bastard of a headline. that in many ways is the point at which the crisis is instigated. i am trying to get into the mindset of richard nixon and tell the story in part through his eyes and his own experience and to a certain extent being for the guy who is having a nervous breakdown and career killing moment in what he takes to be a very important -- we all take to be a very important political career. i wanted to use the novelistic approach but i also wanted to have big themes by telling this story and what i figured i would do now is just kind of tell you about some of those big seams of interest to people who go to places like politics and prose and are
that my colleague from oregon was discussing earlier. that if you have a phrase in the law and it's been interpreted by a secret court and the interpretation is secret, then you really don't know what the law means. the fisa court is a judicial body established by congress to consider requests for surveillance made under the fisa amendments act, but almost without exception, it's decisions including significant legal interpretations of the statute remain highly classified. they remain secret. i'm going to put up this chart just to emphasize that this is a big deal. here in america, if the law makes a reference to what the boundary is, we should understand so it can be debated. if the court reaches an interpretation that congress is uncomfortable, we should change that. but of course we can't change that not knowing what the interpretation is because the interpretation is secret. so we are certainly constrained from having the type of debate that our nation was founded on, an open discussion of issues. now, these are issues that can be addressed without in any way compromising the nationa
to kick off this series is gordon smith, former senator for the state of oregon, current president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters. welcome, sir. >> guest: thank you. good to be back. >> host: also joining us for the conversation, ted gotsch of telecommunications report, serves as senior editor. senator smith, could you start by talking to us about how people watch television in the current day as say even opposed to fife years ago -- five years ago? >> guest: well, clearly, a lot is happening in telecommunications generally, and broadcasting is affected by that. we're sort of the original wireless, but we remain highly relevant because what we do tends, it is local, and as to those who want to get it the old-fashioned way, it is free. and yet you have satellite, you have cable, and now you have the internet through hulu and netflix and others that are other ways for people to access television. so television remains highly relevant to the future because when you look at the top hundred programs that are watched, 90 of them are broadcast content. and so i think the futu
in relation to amendment number 3435, offered by the senator from oregon, mr. merkley. mr. reid: mr. president? mr. president? could we have order. the presiding officer: yes. order, please. mr. merkley: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: and, please. mr. reid: mr. president, we're going to have two more votes tonight. they will both be ten minutes in duration, in addition to the debate time that's already been established. then we're going to move in a very direct way to complete as much of the debate time on the amendments on the supplemental. it's extremely important we get this debate completed tonight so we can start voting in the morning. we have already set up, we're going to have some votes in the morning. we're going to come in probably about 9:30 and start voting. we have a lot to do. it would really be good if people who have amendments on the supplemental, use your debate time tonight. we're going to have no more votes tonight but tomorrow there's going to be limited amount of debate time. so senators -- se
, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small farm tawld tipping tree farm. we wish they could be here today, our grandson carter, who is a proud member of the university of oregon marching band, the ducks, who served as an intern for me -- not at government expense, by the way, that was at our expense. and our little dog dakota, who has become sort of a mascot of the united states senate. brian williams when he did a show on a day in the life of senate concluded that program by calling dakota the 101st senator. and, you know, i think he will be missed perhaps more than i am as i leave the senate. in 1964 i came here, i sat up in the gallery, in fact, it was the gallery right up here. and i was 16 years old. and i watched a debate in the united states senate. it was on civil rights. hubert humphrey was leading that debate. and it so inspired me that i thought, you know, someday i'd like to be down on that floor and i would like to debate the great issues of the day and i would like to represent the people of north dakota. and so i went home and wrote out on the back
is really worried about it. remember, california and oregon, the centers of power in the united states, this is one of the reason lincoln wanted to build the transcontinental railroad once the civil war begins because he wants to expand the reach of the federal authority there was fear that there would be a west coast -- if you think about why did lincoln do what he did it for some princess of carolina part of the logic of this was in the states that have already succeeded from the union, but the prospect of the country as a whole falling apart of the federal government didn't assert its power and its authority, the west coast there were some secessionist sentiments and in the midwest we can talk about new york becoming a free port of entry like britain and germany. so we look back knowing the result of all of this which of course led to the emergence of the nation states with much greater powers reached is a precarious it was for a long period of time but it's also important to recognize the slave rights in terms of the civil war it was a broad state right settlement but the only stat
administration was really worried about it. remember california and oregon are very far away from centers of power in the united states. this is one of the reasons that lincolnmented to build a -- lincoln wanted to build a transcontinental railroad once the civil war begins because he wanted to extend the reach. there were fears -- if you think about what lincoln did what he did in south carolina, part of the logic of this was not just the states that had already seceded from the union, by the prospect of the country as a whole falling apart if the federal government didn't assert its power and its authority. the west coast, there was some secessionist sentiment. in the midwest, there was talk about new york being a free port of entry like britain and germany. we look back knowing the result of all of this, which, of course, led to the emergence, really, of a nation state for the first time, and one with much greater powers and reach than it had before, and you can forget how procariuos the union was for a long period of time, but i think it's also important to recognize, and this is abou
was the first 1981. it my understanding is that it was senator mark hatfield of oregon is idea. getting to face california the way. the biggest factor was the fact that now so many more people can view it. now you just, just of a 2 million people there for obama's inauguration four years ago, by far the biggest. its skin -- they can give out all the like. one letter and 40-150000 tickets and the rest of the people to show up and stand there. when they used to be on the side there weren't more than about 20,000 people who could you the actual ceremony. more could be present for the parade and oftentimes there were more than a million people for the parade, but not the ceremony itself. >> are all the pictures you showed on the slides in your book? >> not quite, but many of them yes. i have many pictures in my book that are not part of the slide show. there were some here that are not in the book. if you take a look at the book you will see. there are more than 50 pictures about. >> they say it costs a lot. i don't have an exact figure, but i would hope it would it would be somewhat scaled back, n
programming. in portland, oregon, street books at the library for people who live on the streets, clinton books by bicycle, and memphis, tennessee, wheelman read, brings african-american men together with three to five-year-olds to develop a lifelong readers. i would like to ask each of the winners to stand and be recognized for the dedication they bring to their task. [applause] >> and finally, i would like to thank my fellow board members for their hard work. and i have to acknowledge the foundation staff this year under the tireless leadership of harold. now listen to this, two weeks ago, the foundation offices were flooded. they have not reopened, and in the past three days the staff have pulled a seven big events including this one with no telephones, no office, no mail. computer servers now reside in herald dining from. from all of us, our heartfelt thanks. [applause] now, on behalf of the national book foundation, congratulations to all our finalists. good luck, and on to the awards ceremony. thank you. [applause] >> just a few orders of business before we begin the awards. one is
to los vegas. >> what your background. >> i grew up in portland, oregon. i am an active mormon. and when on a mission for the mormon church. a graduate from byu and worked for the cia. then i broke out into the financial world. since then says they got married , five children to move to the mamas for two years, save enough money to move to the london worry butterfly and in pen to 71 countries. my primary source of income is my investment news article forecast of strategies that have written since 1980, but i also have 1 foot in the academic world. everett number of books on economics, @booktv and business, columbia university in new york and now mercy college. i should also mention my wife does the income from festival, so we have a film festival as well. a lot of things that we do and really enjoy it. >> what did you do for the cia? >> question. i was an economist on the brazil desk very much involved with commodities in the energy crisis in the 70's. the cia was just too bureaucratic for me. so i wanted to break out and do something more on gennaro. i get involved in the financial revo
, the senator from oregon, mr. wiendz, is -- mr. wyden, is recognized. bliend: thank you. i thank leader reid for the honor of being able to open this morning's debate and i want to particularly identify with a point that the leader made that there's an old saying that most of life is just showing up, and i think what the american people want, and i heard this at checkout lines in our local stores, for example, this week, they want everybody back in washington and going to work on this issue just as the leader suggested. i think senators know that i'm really a charter member of what i guess you could call the optimist caucus here in the senate, and as improbable as some of these talkingheads say on tv, i still think we ought to be here just as the leader said working on this issue because the consequences -- mr. reid: mr. president, would my friend yield for a question? mr. wyden: i will be happy to. mr. reid: the distinguished senator from oregon and i served together in the house of representatives. do you remember the days when the house voted as a body, not a majority of the majority, but
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
about this. 11 oregon for a lot of the '90s. my family and i, but before i went to oregon i used to go and have lunch all the time atop the empire state-building. i remember i was very happy after he wrote the rats book. budget guys who are churck guides at the empire state-building gave me free passes to the top and now is great. i used to have lunch up there and you know kind of obvious but it's a great view. >> really? >> really, really good view. i remember as a kid reading about lincoln, abe lincoln and him saying no, this is where it all happened. he was just trying to get votes in jersey i'm sure, but he kept saying i know that reading all about the war when i was a kid, the war happened in new jersey and so there was always that idea and then you hang out any start doing the math. wow, most of the battles were here. and then you get into why did the value of -- the constitution happened and they did a big thing in philadelphia in the 1800's and they pushed valley forge at that time and even crossing the delaware, not a big deal for americans until the 1940s and 50's when it l
party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small farm tawld tipping tree farm. we wish they could be here today, our grandson carter, who is a proud member of the university of oregon marching band, the ducks, who served as an intern for me -- not at government expense, by the way, that was at our expense. and our little dog dakota, who has become sort of a mascot of the united states senate. brian williams when he did a show on a day in the life of senate concluded that program by calling dakota the 101st senator. and, you know, i think he will be missed perhaps more than i am as i leave the senate. in 1964 i came here, i sat up in the gallery, in fact, it was the gallery right up here. and i was 16 years old. and i watched a debate in the united states senate. it was on civil rights. hubert humphrey was leading that debate. and it so inspired me that i thought, you know, someday i'd like to be down on that floor and i would like to debate the great issues of the day and i would like to represent the people of north dakota.
to be on the west side of the capitol. mike understanding is that there was a center of oregon, ronald reagan fought and was a good idea, he was beginning to discover for the that way. he liked that idea but the biggest factor was the fact that now so many more people can view that. now they're there for you obama add delete your inauguration four years ago there were a thousand tickets and they still live tv commercials up and they stand there. but when it used to be on the east side there were about 20,000 people who could see the actual ceremony. and a lot more of course could be present for the parade and oftentimes there were more than a million but not for the ceremony itself. >> are all of the pictures you showed on the slides were those pictures in your book? >> not quite all of them, but many of them coming yes. i have many pictures in my book that are not part of the slide show that were sent here that are not in the book. >> if you take a look at the book you will see there's more than 50 pictures in the book. yes. >> [inaudible] scan it costs a lot. i don't have an exact figure, but i wo
in portland, oregon. hi, matthew. >> caller: good morning. can you hear me? >> host: good morning. >> caller: i just like to bring up a couple women heroes i was thinking. famous in ireland in ulster, a famous warrior woman that was known the pest warrior out of all of ireland and she had a training camp in ulster where all the real high-quality warriors would go and learn from her. and a lady in -- that helicopter -- a welsh lading that helped lead a resistance against a roman invasion, and bill hooks, a famous writer, and also -- advocating for compulsory education for girls in pakistan who was tried and murdered. i'd like to make that comment. my condolences to your parents, and i love that. i love how you talked about the -- do not have to be -- more than capable of being trained to be able to defend themselves. and, yeah, so peace and love. >> host: matthew. >> guest: i appreciate that. i should also tell you that so many, matthew, of the people that got -- when we started writing "heros for my son" and i went on facebook or twitter and said please send me other heros and so many people
the first to be on the west side of the capitol. among understanding is that it was a senator of oregon's idea and reagan thought it was a good idea she would be getting to face california that way. he liked that idea. but the biggest factor was now so many people can view it. now there were 1.8 million people for obama as inauguration four years ago. by far the biggest. they can give out all of that about 140 or 150,000 tickets and the rest of the people show up and stand there. but when it used be on the east side there were about 20,000 people who could view the actual ceremony to read and oftentimes there were a million people for the parade. >> are all of the pictures that you showed on the slides are those pictures. >> i have many pictures were not part of the slide show that were here if you take a look at the book you will see i've got more than 50 pictures in the book. >> yes? >> [inaudible] >> they do say that it costs a lot. i don't have an exact figure but i would hope they would be somewhat scaled back this time not only because of the economy but the second inauguration. b
for the people there, unfortunately. >> host: kelly, cottage grove oregon please go ahead with your question or comment for our author, rajiv chandrasekeran. >> caller: hello. i just want to say thank you. i've been wondering about, for a long time, it's like are just talking yesterday with someone, if we took all the money that we've been spending on the war and just help the people. of course, on one person's ideaf help is different. build nice houses, excellent -- the whole nine yards. probably would've come out saving a lot of money. but apparently that's not what they wanted. i just want to say thank you. you've answered a lot of questions in the back of my head you don't read about in the local media. >> guest: thank you for your comment. you know, i sort of joke with friends that at times, you know, had we just flown a bunch of our military cargo planes over the country and pushed out six powerless build with dollar bills we might have done more good than the billions of dollars that were spent through contractors, contractors who hired expensive security guards and only a fraction of
for their advice of oregon. we can use that advice to help our nonprofit. >> when i was at random house, one of the most distinguished. they invented. the couple hundred thousand. this particular occasion it was about 300,000. it was the history of the spanish inquisition. don't worry about that. well, that was really actually in the end of the book said he recommended. a very tricky publishing. in just a mention one instance. i have told books and the library association. towboats. night and day. and i said, let me argue with my chairman about weather every book should be publishable. it can't be both. a said, these books, tell me what profit there were. came back again. lost $3,603,000 of those books. go away. go through the editors' choices. twenty-seven books of the new york times. that's the good news. now 367,000. published to that made a profit of 2 million. the world of publishing. in terms of the book, thomas said this in their defense, often publishing books then there were going to lose. we can't make it work. and then surprise surprise occasionally it does. that's why was asking.
quorum call: mr. merkley: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. merkley: mr. president, i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley merkley: thank you. ,mr. president. i wanted to make a few comments on what has transpired here on the floor of the senate. first, some enormously good work has been done with regard to addressing the disaster caused by hurricane sandy. i know in a number of states, unprecedented devastation has occurred and we should respond extremely quickly, more quickly than we have. and i hope the house will immediately take up this -- this package. certainly, disaster relief delayed is disaster relief denied. so i hope the house will, indeed, move extremely quickly to address the devastation throughout the northeast. mr. president, i also wanted to note that tonight, 55 senators stood up and said as we assist the victims of hurricane sandy, we should also assist the victims of unprecedented drought and fires that devastated much of our country this last summer. how is it, you might w
: the senator from oregon. mr. merkley: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley: thank you, mr. president. i rise for a few moments to share a few thoughts about our friend and colleague who passed away yesterday, senator dan inouye. it was a shock to be here on the floor yesterday when his passing was announced. and it's still a shock today to see that it is, indeed, real, the beautiful bowl of white roses on his desk. and i wanted to share just a remembrance or two. when i was 19, i was struggling with what direction to take in life. and thought public policy might be something worth pursuing. so i asked my father, i said -- my father read the newspaper every day and would sit and watch the evening news and run a commentary on the world. and i asked him, if i was to try to get a summer internship in washington, d.c. to see how government really works, who should i apply to? and, of course, he noted that i should apply to my home state senator, senator packwood and senator hatfield. and i asked him if there were any national senators who s
lived in oregon for a lot of the 90's to my family. before i went to oregon i used to go have lunch all the time. i remember this now. i was very happy after i wrote the book. a bunch of guys who work toward guides gave me free passes to the top of the empire. and that was great. we spent lunch attack. kind of obvious, but it's a great view. and so -- >> really? >> really. really great deal. i just remember, remember as a kid reading about lincoln and and saying, you know, this was where it all happened. i know, and he was trying to get votes in new jersey. but he kept saying, i know that reading all about the war, but what happened here. it happened in new jersey. and so there is always that idea. and then if you hang out and start doing the math, while, most of the bells are here. but and then you get into why valley forge became the famous winter. then you look it anniversaries and the anniversary of the constitution happened. it did a big thing in philadelphia in the 1800's. the kind of pushed valley forge. even like it that crossing of the delaware, not a big deal for americans unt
of the pancreas removed and not remove the spleen. removing or not removing an oregon based on which door you walk into comedies are all good hospitals and good hospitals with good reputations. removing it colin. they're two different ways of doing it, minimally invasive and an open incision in some say you can do it either way. we have a "new england journal of medicine" study that's over 10 years older shows a minimally invasive is better and it's common sense that it's better but there is a the wild west of medicine that only half of the patients that need minimally invasive we'll ever have it done that way. >> host: you use the term the wild west of medicine and elsewhere in your book you talk about the need to have a new sheriff in town. so, talk to me a little bit about this concept of the new sheriff in town or a con ability or holding people responsible and how that balances with what we frequently hear when we try and move forward with standardization or accountability as an artform and medicine. out of those two things kind of play out? >> guest: i get the artform of medicine. most of th
. in the mornings i get up and it is oregon and i have a desk for writing and the desk for drying and i like drawing better. and i work and anything in letterman's office is the most exciting adventure, ten books and believed or not i am 30 ahead that i haven't even shown, all illustrated, i am just having such a great time doing this stuff. they asked me what did i -- what were my prerequisites for writing a book and it has got to be simply a i say i am going to write it takes 15 years, i've had books take that long, i am going to finish. the other one is it can't be another book. i like subjects that have never been touched where you have the challenge of going back and digging and bringing this to life and the rule i have is tom's lawyer or mark twain came back today they would say how did he know that? that is my biggest joy. i wanted to know the name of the dog and the story of san francisco, wind directions, which shop burned, everything that went on, as alive as i possibly can. the way i got this idea, it was 1991 and i was reading, it may have been already -- a little tiny paragraphs about b
. as the persian friends in oregon the ultimate result of the iranian revolution in to get business degrees and did well but the stratum below that came to the united states. whenever there is an of people we get more. those changes so dramatically. diet, food, we hear becoming the international nation. [laughter] what a wonderful description. we have time for one last question. >> from global affairs, thank you for your time. a quick comment, the map tells us for the arab-israeli peace in relation to water scarcity issues? >> turkey has all the water with the middle level power. to discuss israel in four places this is where we come down to a geographic determinism. this is precious and is more precious and more in more people are on the disputed territory. ra to it achieved. what we have been preoccupied with iran and israeli settlement building is robust. it does not gterritory. rather sellers or the rising arab birthrate. it becomes harder and harder to it achieved. what we have been preoccupied with iran and israeli settlement building is robust. it does not get much news, but facts are on the
for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small farm tawld tipping tree farm. we wish they could be here today, our grandson carter, who is a proud member of the university of oregon marching band, the ducks, who served as an intern for me -- not at government expense, by the way, that was at our expense. and our little dog dakota, who has become sort of a mascot of the united states senate. brian williams when he did a show on a day in the life of senate concluded that program by calling dakota the 101st senator. and, you know, i think he will be missed perhaps more than i am as i leave the senate. in 1964 i came here, i sat up in the gallery, in fact, it was the gallery right up here. and i was 16 years old. and i watched a debate in the united states senate. it was on civil rights. hubert humphrey was leading that debate. and it so inspired me that i thought, you know, someday i'd like to be down on that floor and i would like to debate the great issues of the day and i would like to represent the people
. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. merkley: mr. president, i ask consent that the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley: thank you, mr. president. i wanted to take a few minutes to speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, tonight we're wrapping up affairs here on the floor, and what is going on right now is that the main substitute amendment that had a whole series of other amendments attached to it that has been the result of the work over the last couple days has been withdrawn. and so we're back to square one in terms of addressing a series of national disasters around the country. and tomorrow the new amendment, we'll start off the day with a new basic amendment and a new chance to have amendments to the replacement. and i explain this simply to say that a number of senators who had amendments over the last couple of days will come back tomorrow, will ask to have their amendments considered. and i'll be one of them. and i wan
from oregon is on the floor also. as we talk about the deficit, it has taken center stage right now, we want to highlight one very clear thing -- social security has not contributed, is not part of and never will contribute to the deficit. so those that like to mettle in it and way to combine it into this deficit talk are just playing games with our seniors and disabled in this country. it is a separate issue. it is not impacting the federal deficit and it should be not -- and i know some like to meld it in because they want to talk about cuts, and their favorite line is privatize, which really means seniors and disabled get a lot less in the future. they will not get the guarantee that they paid into. also, i want to give credit to congressman ted deutsch who has a similar measure on the house side. both of our plans we know may be difficult to pass but we're going to continue to push forward on it. we won't be alone. a coalition of over 300 national and state organizations have already endorsed our bill. together, they represent 50 million americans. they are on board because this bil
in dealing with this because i found out later that his life had oregon sold to mgm. so he had to pay back mgm to write schindler's list. the head of simon & schuster said, oh, don't bother. but i was quite keen on publishing this book and author. eventually i did. and i paid a shocking price in today's market. $60,000 and, of course, the book has never been out of print. steven spielberg did the movie, and i remember one he telephoned me and said we are really making a good film. [laughter] and i stayed until 1981. and i went to hell, it was much more, i learned a great deal. but houghton was an old-fashioned publisher that i was more used to. it was wonderful. the authors followed me. so for about six and a half years, that was at the time that there were all these takeovers random house -- random house was the first one to go public. and then it went into the office and said we are going public and there will be a stock offer. everything will go up, then we'll go right down again. i am not advising anyone to buy stock, i'm just telling you what to do. and then when i was at simon & schu
laboratory at the oregon health science university. will you rise and take the oath. raise your right hands. this is the moment you have waited for. do you swear or affirm the testimony you're about to give will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth >>> yes. >> let the record reflect all witnesses answered in the affirmative. >>> as the ranking member said, today really is about the science and a lead in to what if necessary will be a series of hearings until the issue is resolved. so the panel i'd asking since the entire opening statements be placed on the record, if you run short of time, as former chairman used to say, green we know it goes. yellow mean goes fast through the intersection and stop means don't run it anymore. so if you'll come as close to that five minute as possible. we appreciate it. doctor? >> good morning, issa, ranking member. >> the other thing, these microphones in order to get people behind you in to the conversation you have to get as close as possible. >> thank you. >> good morning chairman issa, ranking member cummings, and distinguished member
capital. for example, home forward, known as the portland housing authority in portland, oregon, used project-based vouchers to provide houses to formally homeless veterans served by a service coordinator and services provided by the va program. flexibility allows home forward to provide security deposits to veterans using housing vouchers as well. the department has some of the most important stake holders from public housing authorities and advocacy communities able to negotiate through differences over mtw in order to advance broader section 8 reform. as the community crafts legislation, we hope you consider the stake holder approach. mr. chairman, there is an irrefutable need for rental assistance in the nation. at the same time, there is long standing consensus on a set of reforms that will streamline and simply administration of the voucher system and housing program. hud is committed to improving not just the administration of the programs, but its oversight of the public housing programs as well, and we look forward to working with the committee and industry partners to devel
private exam. for example home forward the portland housing authority, in portland oregon, used vouchers for homeless veterans, and the building is served by a full-time residences coordinator and serviced provided by the va program. flex the allows home forward to provide security deposits using housing vouchers as well. the department is pleased some of the most important stake holders from public housing authorities and low income housing advocacy communities were able to negotiate through the difference over mtw in order to advance broader section 8 reform. at z community crafts its legislation, we hope you consider the stake holder approach. mr. chairman, there is an irrefutable need for assistance and communities across the nation. at the same time there is long standing consensus on a set of reforms that streamline and simplify administration of the housing choice voucher and public housing program. hud's committed to not improving just the administration of the programs but its oversight of the public ho
, and oregon subsequently ranked near the bottom in children's dental health. many portlanders treasure their city's quirk ri distinctiveness, said "the new york times," and i agree -- [laughter] being toothless is quirk ri and distinctive. and, basically, i'm not going to read this quote from "the new york times"esing but basically, a couple weeks ago the city counsel finally approved fluoridation to begin in 201. really, a round of applause for portland for joining the 20th century. i love portland. if you're going to san francisco, be sure the bring a plunger. low-flow toilets -- not san francisco's fault, actually signed into law by president george h.w. bush, bush 41 -- which required low-flow toilets. now, the impact of that is sludge will back up in the city's sewers, and the mission bay neighborhood, quote of of-unquote, smells like rotten eggs. they're using $14 million of taxpayer money to dump bleach into the sewer to clean up a problem that previously simply did not exist. bleach isn't, also, a very friendly chemical, by way. all right. so who can you trust in science? well,
, in portland, oregon, street book as a library who live on the streets lending them book by baby and memphis, tennessee, real men read brings african-american men together with 3-year-olds to develop lifelong. i would like them to stand. [applause] [cheering and applause] and finally, i would like to thank my fellow board members, for their hard work and i have to acknowledge the foundation staff this year under the tirelessly leadership of harrold, listen this this week two weaks ago the foundation us a were flooded. they have not reopened. in the past three days, the staff have pulled off seven wig events including this one with no telephones, no office, no mail, computer serve ease reside in harrold's dining room all of us our heart felt thanks. [applause] [applause] ton the awards ceremony. thank you. [cheering and applause] just a few orders of business before we begin. one is that's the bookings on your table, you're allowed to take home. i'm sitting with harrold and he said you can. if you wrote one of them and taking it home. that's a little weird. you can take the rose petals, if th
check-up, a tool developed by the child and family certain at the university of oregon which highlights evidence-based parenting skills in preventing initiation of drug use among youth. so as i close, we should remind ourselves that our good health is a gift. it is precious, it is fragile, and it's particularly fragile for our kids. so while we've made progress on a number of these issues, we need to redouble our efforts for prevention. we all can do more to help our kids enjoy a fighting chance for health. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, dr. koh. i've had the fortunate opportunity and unique one to interact with dr. koh and his staff over the last number of years on a number of initiatives, and currently, of course, working with dr. volkow and previously having the opportunity to work with our next speaker who is mr. gil coal kousky who was nominated by president obama and confirmed by the u.s. senate as director of the office of national drug control policy in the white house. in this position, he coordinates all aspects of federal drug control programs and implementatio
towrntion connecticut, you a rohr a, colorado, oak creek, which is, which and portland, oregon. these were just fairly recently, mr. president. as president obama said last night, no one law can erase evil, no policy can prevent a determined madman from committing a senseless act of violence. but we need to accept the reality that we're not doing enough to protect our citizens. in the coming days and weeks we'll engage in a meaningful conversation and thoughtful debate about how to change laws in culture that allow this violence to continue to grow. we have no greater responsibility than keeping our most vulnerable and most precious resource -- our children -- safe. and every idea should be on the table as we discuss how best to do just that. mr. president, today we have an opportunity, as i mentioned a little bit earler, to pull together to help the citizens of new york, new jersey, and other parts of the northeast as they recover from the damn of hurricane van dihurricane sandy. as we did before, we have an opportunity to help maim make families and communities whole again. i hope my col
the first proposed five high-speed rail routes in america and one of them was from eugene, oregon to vancouver, british columbia, and we will hear a bit later from paula hammond this secretary of transportation in my state, who will describe our progress, or lack thereof, small amount of progress in achieving those goals. but we're plugging away at it. this is not an easy thing. right-of-way issues are very problematic. the conflicts between freight and passenger rail. we need to invest time and effort in helping to work those things through. but die -- i do believe the american people want high and higher speed rail. california is trying something unique in terms of the new right-of-way. they're seeing difficulties about that has the promise of true high-speed rail, which can pretty much only come with new and dedicated right-of-way which is problematic and expensive. but i still believe that there's a tremendous market for this, and if done right, it will be something that future generations of americans will look back on and say they can't believe there was a day when we were w
private capital. for example, the portland housing authority in portland, oregon, uses project-based vouchers to provide housing to formerly [inaudible] on flexibility, it allows us to provide this to veterans using housing vouchers as well. the department is pleased that some of our most important stakeholders from public housing authorities and low-income housing were able to negotiate their differences and in order to advance broader section eight reform. as the community craft the legislation, we hope you will consider the stakeholder approach. mr. chairman, there is an irrefutable need for rental assistance across this nation. at the same time, there is long-standing consensus on a set of reforms that will streamline and simplify the administration of the housing choice voucher and the public housing program. improving not only the oversight of the programs as well, we look forward to working with the committee and industry partners to develop property-based oversight structure. we also recognize that any expansion of the program must be coupled with measures to protect te
, washington, oregon, california, hawaii has been threatened by hundreds of thousands of tons of debris washing ashore from the tragic tsunami in japan nearly two years ago. that's why this legislation asks noaa to take a closer look at the tsunami debris and make sure we are putting an accurate assessment and risk in place to protect the west coast. if they decide that it is a severe marine debris event, then they will need to present a specific coordination plan developed to meet that threat and work with local governments, counties and tribes and to make sure that there is a coordinated effort to protect our economy and environment from tsunami debris. we know in the northwest because we have already seen ships, we have seen bridges, we have seen various parts float ashore, oftentimes local communities having to share the burden and expense of cleaning up the tsunami debris. with over 165,000 jobs and nearly $11 billion in our coastal economy from fishing to tourism to various activities, we want to make sure that tsunami debris does not hurt our coastal economies. all you need to do is ask
in provision regarding teachers home offices, something every teacher in oregon was writing us about it seemed. we debated these issues. we decided these issues, and it was a simple majority. that's the way the senate deliberated and decided issues over our history until the last 40 years when this massive, massive expansion of the use of the objection to simple majority has paralyzed this body. i thought that it was interesting to see this cartoon. it says "i'll tell you all the reasons we shouldn't reform the filibuster." i assume it's depicting a senator on the floor of the senate. number one, it could restrict my ability to frivolously stymie everything. then the senator says number two, -- well, the senator thinks about it, grimaces, frowns, can't think of any other reason that we shouldn't reform the filibuster other than the ability to frivolously stymie everything. and then finally the senator says how long do i have to keep talking? and little partner down here says you could read recipes for paralysis. well, that's what we have. that's what we have in the u.n. senate right with -- u.
higher. that's a worrisome statistic host back shannon, portland, oregon, good afternoon. this is booktv on c-span2. >> caller: hello. i want to start off by saying you're a great men of integrity and it's a pleasure to talk to you. >> guest: thank you. >> caller: i'm an fdr democrat, and we have crossed the bridge before although obvious it wasn't quite as great a situation when it comes to the debt. when you're talking that $88 trillion. we know that money can't be paid back. we're just trying to purchase our way out of it. so, what's wrong with going back to what fdr did in doing large-scale infrastructure projects to put people back to work, what have a real living wage so that we can start to pay down the debt? >> guest: i don't think there's anything wrong with that but you can't do both. we don't have the money to do both. what you have to do is give back some of what we are doing to be able to do that. and remember, much of what we did under fdr was, we had a much larger component of labor than what we do today. if you think about building dams are building roads and building b
. these i.d.'s limiting the early voting. states like oregon and others have figured out you can vote by mail without fraud. you can have the opportunities to vote extended in early voting and absentee voting and give people their voice in this democracy. if we want to restore the confidence -ftd american -- of e american people in our government we've got to give them the right to vote on election day. standing in line for seven hours is embarrassing in every state it happens. i know the tradition. state laws determine election standards. that's the way it goes. but when it comes to federal elections, reef a voice in the -- we have a voice in the process and we've got to make sure we come together on a bipartisan basis to deal with it. i'm pleased chairman leahy and i are going to be able to work together to hold a hearing in the full judiciary committee next wednesday, december 19, to continue to explore this issue, and then into the new congress we'll be proposing specific legislation to deal with this issue. though another election season may have ended, our work to perfect or uni
. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon is recognized. mr. merkley: i ask for regular order with respect to my amendment, 3367. the presiding officer: the amendment is now pending. mr. merkley: i have a modification at the desk and a ask my amendment be so modified. the presiding officer: the amendment is so modified. mr. merkley: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent to add senator franken, senator tim johnson, and senator tom udall as cosponsors to the amendment. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley: thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. mr. leahy: mr. president, i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma is recognized. mr. inhofe: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the quorum call in progress be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. inhofe: it's my understanding at 4:00 senator durbin from illinois will be speaking and i ask unanimous consent i be allowed to speak at the conclu
by the senator from oregon, mr. merkley. ms. mikulski: mr. president, the senate is not in order. we need to hear the gentleman offering the amendment. the presiding officer: the senator is correct. the senate should be in order. would senators please take their conversations off the floor. would senators please clear the well and take their conversations off the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon is recognized. mr. merkley: mr. president, i'm delighted to partner with senator blunt and senator stabenow on this important amendment which addresses the disasters that occurred this last summer in terms of the centuries -- a century's worth, the worst fires and the worst drought. this is a true emergency in which our response has been delayed because of programs that are tied up in the farm bill. i reserve the balance of my time but ask colleagues let's address this real emergency. mr. sessions: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama is recognized. mr. sessions: this amendment -- and i respect my colleague's desire to get this matte
: the senator from oregon. mr. wyden: i ask unanimous consent to vacate the quorum call -- we're not in a quorum call. i ask unanimous consent to call up my amendment which is at the desk. the presiding officer: without objection. the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: the senator from oregon, mr. wyden for himself and others proposes amendment numbered 3439. at the end, add ad the following, section 5, report on the impact of the fisa amendments act of -- mr. wyden: i ask unanimous consent the amendment be considered as read. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, there will be 30 minutes of debate, equally divided prior to the vote on the wyden amendment. mr. wyden: mr. president, given the events of yesterday, this is the last opportunity for the next five years for the congress to exercise a modest measure of real oversight over this intelligence surveillance law. here's why: colleagues, it is not real oversight when the united states congress cannot get a yes or no answer to the question of whether an estimate currently exists as to whether
oregon. mr. wyden: mr. president, both sides are working on an agreement to approve the intelligence authorization bill for 2013 by unanimous consent. i voted against this legislation when it was marked up in committee. i objected to it here on the floor last month. but i am able to support it at this time. the bill has a number of valuable provisions in it and i thank chairwoman feinstein and vice chairman chambliss for making the changes in the bill to address my concerns. the changes that senators feinstein and chambliss have made would remove a number of provisions that were intended to reduce unauthorized disclosures of classified information of course known as leaks. i objected to these provisions because, in my view, they would have harmed first amendment rights, led to less-informed public debate about national security issues, and undermined the due process rights of intelligence agency employees without actually enhancing national security. i'm going to take just a few minutes to explain my views on this so that those who are not on the intelligence committee and who have n
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